DEALER LOGIN
Trend
Login  |  Register
Items 0  |   View order

Guiding the Router

Guiding the Router
  Various techniques of guiding the router.
     

Free Hand Routing

Free Hand Routing
  The small portable router is ideal for carrying out free-hand routing. First mark out on the material the pattern required. Engraving can be done with a ‘V’ groove, 1/4” straight or small radiused cutter. Taking shallow passes will ensure there is complete control of the router. For increased control, guidance of the router can be made by holding the base of the router, with arms resting on the workpiece.
Free Hand Routing
 
     

Using Guide Bushes and Templates

Using Guide Bushes and Templates
  Guide bushes are available in different diameters to allow various diameter cutters to be accommodated. Choose a guide bush that allows at least 2 to 3mm clearance around the cutter to allow waste to clear. Templates should be cut from MDF or a hard material of a thickness slightly greater than the guide bush depth (i.e. for 5mm bush flange projection, allow minimum 6mm thickness). When cutting out templates, ensure that the edges are smooth otherwise any irregularities will be repeated on the workpiece.
Using Guide Bushes and Templates
  When drawing out the template shape, remember that the difference between the cutter and outside guide bush diameter needs to be allowed for.
This margin (E) is calculated by deducting the cutter diameter (d) from the outer guide bush diameter (D) and dividing the remainder by two. (E = (D-d) ÷ 2).
For external templates deduct this amount from each edge of the template or guide. For internal templates add this amount to each edge.
Using Guide Bushes and Templates
  A guide bush is primarily used for guiding the cutter around the edge of a pre-cut template or along a purpose made slotted panel with slot width to match the bush flange diameter. The guide bush itself, fitted flush into the base of the router, has a bush flange concentric to the cutter. This runs against the edge of the template or guide. When routing, follow the correct feed direction, depending on whether it is an internal or external template. Keep the bush flange tight up against the template and do not lift the router as it will cut into the template edge.
Using Guide Bushes and Templates
 
     

Using The Side-Fence

Using The Side-Fence
  The side fence is mounted by sliding it into the router base. Mount it against a parallel edge of the workpiece to rout a rebate or central groove. Adjust its position in from the edge of the workpiece, by sliding the rods through the base of the router. Position the router and side-fence onto the workpiece, and adjust the fence until the edge of the cutter aligns with the correct position of the cut. Tighten up all the clamping knobs.
Using The Side-Fence
  Turn the router on and position the router up to the edge of the workpiece. Then plunge the router in and cut the groove or the rebate. When using the side-fence, keep it firmly against the edge of the workpiece and take care that it does not turn in at the start and finish of the edge. This can be achieved by putting extra pressure on the inside cheek of the side-fence.
Using The Side-Fence
  When rebating narrow sections, the material should be well secured. For router stability fix a piece of waste material, the same thickness, alongside the workpiece. This will prevent the router tipping. Always feed in the correct direction to ensure that the pull of the cutter keeps the side-fence pressing against the workpiece and not pulling away from it.
Using The Side-Fence
  For very narrow sections, clamp extra material on both sides to give support to the router and prevent it from tipping. Often the use of a second side-fence on the opposite side will give extra support.
Using The Side-Fence
  Although pressure on the inside cheek of the side-fence will prevent the router ‘turning in’, extra long wooden cheeks can be screwed to the face of the side-fence. Ideally clamp waste material at either end of the workpiece and carry the cut into them.
     

Using Batten Guides and making a Stub Mortise & Tenon Joint

Using Batten Guides and making a Stub Mortise & Tenon Joint
  Using a batten to guide the router is very useful when:
A. The edge of the workpiece is not parallel to the groove required.
B. The edge of the workpiece is not suitable for guidance, e.g. has a poor finish.
C. The groove is too far in from the edge and therefore the guide rods of the side-fence will not be long enough. The battens should be the same length or longer than the groove required.
Using Batten Guides and making a Stub Mortise & Tenon Joint
  Guide battens should be clamped at each end, but ensure the clamps do not obstruct the router base. Always rout in the correct direction so that the cutter will pull against the batten. Always use the same point on the base to slide up against the batten, as often the base is not uniform in shape. To cut a housing wider than the cutter, clamp two guide battens parallel with each other and position them to give the width of the groove required. Where stopped grooves are required such as for shelf supports, clamp a block at each end to prevent the router from over cutting.
Using Batten Guides and making a Stub Mortise & Tenon Joint
  Stub Mortise & Tenon joints
The Mortise
This is no more than a short groove and is routed with a straight flute cutter. The procedure is to mark the width and length of the mortise. Then set the side fence working from one edge. Make several passes until the depth required is achieved. For each depth setting make two cuts working from both sides of the timber in turn. This will ensure that the mortise is perfectly central. The corners of the mortise will need to be squared off with a sharp chisel.
Using Batten Guides and making a Stub Mortise & Tenon Joint
  The Tenon
To make matching tenons, lay the timber sections side by side and cut all the Shoulders simultaneously, using a clamped batten to guide the router. Now, remove the rest of the waste, by working with the router freehand. Rout the waste from the end of the tenons towards the initial groove. This will ensure there is adequate support for the base of the router and will prevent tipping. Turn all the components over, butt the cut shoulders against a batten secured to the bench and repeat the process to complete the tenons. Short shoulders on the tenon are best cut with a hand-saw.
Using Batten Guides and making a Stub Mortise & Tenon Joint
 
     

Using Bearing Guided Cutters

Using Bearing Guided Cutters
  With bearing guided cutters, setting up is a much simpler operation. No fence or batten is required as the bearing on the cutter acts as the guide. A bearing guide also enables the edge of curved workpieces to be moulded. The edge of the workpiece must be free from imperfections as these will be reflected in the finish of the mould. Where the material thickness leaves insufficient room for the bearing to make contact, a second piece of material can be fixed beneath it for the bearing to follow.
Using Bearing Guided Cutters
  First set the depth of cut to give the required moulding. When routing maintain constant feed speed against the rotation of the cutter throughout the pass and always feed against the rotation of the cutter, e.g. for external moulding, in an anticlockwise direction. With bearing guided cutters such as the rebater supplied in the set, take several passes by adjusting the depth between cuts by 2-3mm.
Using Bearing Guided Cutters
  When moulding natural timbers always mould the end grain first, followed by the long grain. This ensures that if there is breakout, this will be removed when the long grain is routed. When reaching the end of the workpiece, the cutter will have a tendency to ‘rout around the corner’. To prevent this, either fit the side-fence in line with the bearing (if routing straight edges), or rout into a waste piece of material. Once more, fitting elongated fence strips to the fence will be helpful.
     

Using The Beam Trammel

Using The Beam Trammel
  The beam trammel is used for cutting arcs and circles and generally consists of a separate point that screws beneath the base plate, or a bar that is held in the side fence rod clamps. When cutting arcs into the edge of the workpiece, locate a centre block to raise the centre point and position support strips close to the edge, on which to balance the router.
Using The Beam Trammel
  The point of the trammel is located in the centre of the circle by pressing the point into the workpiece. If you wish to avoid marking the work, fix a small pad of timber, with double sided tape at the centre on which to position the centre point. To give extra security to prevent the point slipping out of the pivoting point, recess the tapered bolt deeper into the pad or workpiece.
Using The Beam Trammel
  When cutting completely through the material, the centre piece will come loose as the last pass is made. To prevent it from contacting the cutter, secure it with double sided tape, as well as clamping the outer section before starting the operation.
     
< Back to Index Previous   Previous    
https://uk.trustpilot.com/review/trend-uk.com [^]
 
  Aspin Interactive e-commerce